Raymond W. Acus, III, M.D.

Raymond W. Acus, III, M.D. is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon who is fellowship-trained in both Sports Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery of the Knee and Shoulder. 

An expert surgeon with over 25 years of experience, Dr. Acus specializes in sports medicine, including arthroscopy of the knee and shoulder, ligament reconstructions of the knee, arthroscopic shoulder stabilizations, and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. He also specializes in Total Joint and Partial Joint Reconstructions of the Knee, Shoulder, and Hip.  

He and his caring staff provide comprehensive, state-of-the-art orthopaedic care and are dedicated to relieving pain, restoring function, and providing an excellent patient experience.


Meet Dr. Acus

Raymond W. Acus, III, M.D. was raised in Fairborn, Ohio and graduated from Fairborn Baker High School as Valedictorian.  He attended The Ohio State University and obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology on a partial academic scholarship.  Dr. Acus also earned his medical degree from The Ohio State University.

Dr. Acus completed his internship at the prestigious Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in Chicago, a nationally recognized clinical and research institution.  He served his orthopaedic residency at Akron City Hospital, Summa Health. Dr. Acus furthered his education by completing a Fellowship in Sports Medicine and Reconstruction Surgery of the Knee and Shoulder in Orlando, Florida at the renowned Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic. 

Dr. Acus has extensive experience caring for athletes. While at the Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic, Dr. Acus served as team physician for The University of Central Florida and Rollins College.  He also was team physician for the Orlando Magic, and took care of NBA athletes including Shaquille O’Neil, Nick Anderson, Dennis Scott, and Steve Kerr. For the last 16 years, Dr. Acus has served as head team physician at the University of Akron, along with Dr. Timothy Myer, where he takes care of all their Division 1 athletes.

Dr. Acus is a Fellow of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. He previously served as Head of Level 1 Trauma for Crystal Clinic, and currently serves as Head of Sports Medicine at Crystal Clinic. He is the director of the Allograft Tissue Bank at St. Thomas Hospital. 

Dr.  Acus has numerous peer reviewed publications in orthopaedic surgery (see a complete list here) and has presented multiple research papers at national meetings. He has received a number of awards for his teaching and mentoring of medical students, including the Excellence Award for Outstanding Teaching, presented by orthopaedic residents in 1997, 2001 and 2005 and The Medical Student Teacher of the Year, chosen by medical students in 2002, 2003, 2009, 2012, 2013 and 2016.  He also received the Walter A. Hoyt Research Award in 2016.


Dr. Acus is married with two children.  He enjoys golf, scuba diving, and travel.  He joined Crystal Clinic in 1998.


Meet Dr. Raymond Acus' Staff

Dr. Acus utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach, including physician assistants, physical therapists and radiologists, to provide individualized, compassionate care to his patients.

Crystal Clinic staff who support Dr. Acus include:

Nurse Practitioner
Holly Lang, CNP

Medical Assistant / Secretary
Jennifer (Medical Secretary)
Meredith (Medical Assistant)  

Radiology Technologists
Kelly 
Kim
Kristy

Nursing
Cindy 
Gail
Lesley

Board Certifications

  • Orthopaedic Surgery

Fellowship

  • Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic, Orlando, Florida

Residency

  • Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio

Internship

  • Northwestern University McGraw Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 

Medical School

  • The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio

Specialties

  • Total Joint Replacement Surgery, Sports Medicine
  • Reconstructive Knee, Hip & Shoulder Surgery, Joint Preservation Surgery

Associations

Publications

  1. Perineural fibrosis of superficial peroneal nerve complicating ankle sprain: a case report.
    Acus RW 3rd, Flanagan JP.
    Foot Ankle. 1991 Feb; 11(4):233-5.
    PMID: 1906831
  2. The use of postoperative suction drainage in total hip arthroplasty.
    Acus RW 3rd, Clark JM, Gradisar IA Jr, Kovacik MW.
    Orthopedics. 1992 Nov; 15(11):1325-8. Review.
    PMID: 1461814
  3. Proximal clavicle excision: an analysis of results.
    Acus RW 3rd, Bell RH, Fisher DL.
    J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 1995 May-Jun; 4(3):182-7.
    PMID: 7552675
  4. Posterior thigh compartment syndrome associated with hamstring avulsion and chronic anticoagulation therapy.
    Oseto MC, Edwards JZ, Acus RW 3rd.
    Orthopedics. 2004 Feb; 27(2):229-30. No abstract available
    PMID: 14992394
  5. Rib Stress Fracture in a Collegiate Softball Pitcher: A Case Report.
    Pfefferle KJ, Boyd JA, Acus RW 3rd
    JBJS Case Connect. 2016 Jan-Mar; 6(1):e16. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.CC.O.00086.
    PMID: 29252722
  6. Unusual cause of Transient Visual Loss and Syncope in collegiate athlete
    In progress.
  7. Zoster – Associated Mononeuropathy - Orthopaedics Today
    Anticipated Publication April 2018

Radio Interviews

None listed.

Media Links

None listed.

Acus video

Achilles Tendon Injuries

Acromioclavicular Joint Arthritis

Anatomy of the Knee

Anatomy of the Shoulder

Ankle Sprains

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries in Women

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear (ACL Tear)

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Hip

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Knee

Biceps Tendon Tear (at the Shoulder)

Burners and Stingers

Bursitis of the Hip (Trochanteric Bursitis)

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

Colles Fractures

De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

Glenoid Labrum Tear

Golfer's Elbow

Hip Fracture

Jones Fracture

Meniscus Tear

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

Overuse Injuries of the Elbow

Patellar Fracture

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Injuries

Proximal Humerus Fracture (Broken Shoulder)

Quadriceps Tendon Tear

Rotator Cuff Injuries

Rotator Cuff Tear

Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

Shoulder Dislocation

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder Separation

SLAP Tear (Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior Tear)

Tennis Elbow

Throwing Injuries

Tibial Fractures

Tibial Plateau Fracture

Triceps Tendonitis

Ulnar Collateral Ligament

Total Shoulder Replacement

Total Hip Replacement

Reverse total shoulder replacement

Partial Knee Replacement

Knee Arthroscopy

ACL Reconstruction

Mini Incision Total Knee Replacement

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder stabilization

Rotator cuff repairs

Testimonials

Crystal Clinic Orthopaedic Center’s patient-centered approach to care combines deep orthopaedic knowledge and expertise with a personal commitment to be with you through the entire restorative process. But, you don't have to take our word for it. Read what patients are saying about Dr. Acus:

Crystal Clinic Orthopaedic Center Testimonials

Dr. Acus performed a total knee replacement for me in February 2017.  At the age of 47, I could no longer be as active as I needed to be.  Through the years other surgeons explained that a joint replacement would be needed but to wait until age 60+!  Although having surgery was something I had hoped to avoid, no other doctor was providing options.  Dr. Acus gave me hope.  He never pushed the idea of surgery, instead other treatments such as injections were used.  When those were no longer helpful, the surgery was done.  That decision gave me my life back.  Dr. Acus cares about his patients before, during, and beyond surgery.  He has attention to detail and strives for the best possible outcome.  I'm not sure what my life would be like today if that surgery was put off for 12 more years.  It would have been miserable.  Dr. Acus will be the only surgeon for my future orthopedic needs.   - Gail 

I have gone to Dr. Acus for many years. He is always understanding and most helpful in guiding me through my physical problems.

Dr Acus is the very best orthopedic specialist I have ever visited. I have highly recommended him to many people. Thank you, Dr Acus!

Dr. Acus and his staff were very caring and thoughtful.

I am grateful for Dr. Acus's skill and knowledge. My knee feels great!

I had a very pleasant experience at my visit to see Dr. Acus. The staff was very friendly and courteous and my medical issue was resolved.

Everyone from the receptionist to the nurse to the doctor was very polite and informative. Dr. Acus was very attentive and was able to give me a clear plan of what needed to be done and the contingencies in place if necessary. An overall great experience.

Dr. Acus & his staff are wonderful. Blessed to have them on my care team. Thank you!

We are writing to express our gratitude and appreciation to you and the staff at Crystal Clinic Orthopaedic Center and St. Thomas Hospital.  Both my husband, Bill, and I previously had you repair a torn meniscus and our recovery was uneventful and speedy.  This year I had a problem involving a shoulder, so of course we again were in touch with you. After MRIs and other evaluations, you suggested several options, one being a reverse shoulder replacement due to the condition of the rotator cuff.  After thinking over our options for a few weeks and having been informed as to the procedure as well as recovery time, we decided for the surgery. I had every confidence in you and was determined to follow all of your protocols. The surgery went well and my overnight stay at St. Thomas Hospital was a good experience. The nursing staff was attentive and very helpful in taking care of all my needs. St. Thomas is a wonderful hospital and we found everyone very friendly and caring. I must include that knowing how “blah” hospital food can be, that most certainly was not the case here.  Everything I ordered was tasty and hot!  I am now 11 weeks out from surgery and have already started the final phase of PT. The exercises have become a little more intense, but I do them every day. I am so encouraged with the things I can do now that would have been “iffy” last year.  

I am thankful to have chosen you as my surgeon. You are so likeable in that you have a great personality and a good sense of humor besides being a very skillful surgeon.  You took time with us and explained everything that was going to take place with the surgery. We felt fully informed.  We live in Marietta, Ohio, so most people have no idea that the Crystal Clinic Orthopaedic Center is so accessible.  We are trying to make more people aware that they do have another EXCELLENT choice. Thank you again for your fine care.

Dr. Acus replaced my knee and I can dance and hike again. He is a very caring personable doctor. I highly recommend him for any orthopedic problems.


Testimonials on Vitals.com

Self-verified patient of Dr. Raymond W Acus III - Posted on May 28th, 2016 
I was in a near-fatal auto accident with many injuries. Dr. Acus got the job of rehabilitating the compound fracture of my ankle. Considerable foreign material had to be cleaned out first. Dr. Acus was very diligent in cleaning it up as shown by the fact that I never got infected. I received a copy of my health records from the hospital and was impressed by the difficulty presented by the injuries to the ankle. The doctor seems to have done an excellent job since my ankle is fully functional today (1.5 years later). I would choose Dr. Acus again.

Click here to read more testimonials on Vitals.com for Dr. Acus

Testimonials on HealthGrades.com

Barb, Akron, OH
Dr. Acus replaced my knee and I can dance and hike again. He is a very caring personable doctor. I highly recommend him for any orthopedic problems.

Temperance, MI Oct 04, 2016
VERY. GOOD SURGEON, Quite intelligent, Nice friendly doctor, helped me out , tremendously, would recommend him to people

                    OH Mar 27, 2018
Our son is a high school wrestler and football player. On several occasions we needed Dr. Acus at the Crystal Clinic for a shoulder injury and other sports related injuries'. He is extremely knowledgeable regarding sports medicine and sports injuries with-in athletes. He is thorough, up to date, and complete from beginning to end. Because of Dr. Acus and his excellent care our son was able to get back on the mat/field and earn All Ohio honors.

Click here to read more testimonials on HealthGrades.com for Dr. Acus


Conditions I Treat

Tennis Elbow

This condition, commonly called tennis elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

Golfer's Elbow

This condition, commonly called tennis elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

Overuse Injuries of the Elbow

This condition, commonly called golfer's elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the medial epicondyle, the bony bump on the inner side of the elbow.

Throwing Injuries of the Elbow

Throwing overhand again and again puts a lot of stress on your elbow. It can lead to injury. Young athletes, in particular, are at risk. Some play sports all year without learning

Triceps Tendonitis

This is an inflammation of a tendon at the back of your elbow. It's called the "triceps" tendon. It anchors your upper arm's triceps muscle to the ulna

Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury​

Like other joints, the elbow is held together by strong bands of tissue called "ligaments." On the elbow's inner side is the ulnar collateral ligament complex. We call it the "UCL." It's made of three bands that connect the humerus (the upper arm bone) to the lower arm's ulna. The UCL is the elbow ligament most often injured by baseball pitchers and by other athletes who play throwing sports.

Achilles Tendon Injuries

The Achilles tendons are thick and powerful bands of fibrous tissue. They connect your calf muscles to your heel bones. The tendons help you walk, run and jump. And that means they are under a lot of stress, making injuries to the Achilles tendons common.

Ankle Sprains

Ligaments are fibrous, elastic bands of tissue that connect and stabilize the bones. An ankle sprain is a common, painful injury that occurs when one or more of the ankle ligaments is stretched beyond the normal range of motion. Sprains can occur as a result of sudden twisting, turning or rolling movements.

Jones Fracture

This is a break of a bone in the foot called the "fifth metatarsal." It's on your foot's outer side, behind the little toe. With a Jones fracture, this bone breaks on the end furthest from the toe. The fifth metatarsal doesn't have a good blood supply there, so healing can be difficult.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Pain, numbness and tingling in your hand may be from carpal tunnel syndrome. It happens when the area around the main nerve to your hand is too tight. The nerve is called the median nerve. And the small space in your wrist where it passes is called the carpal tunnel.

Colles Fractures

Colles fracture is a break of one or both of the forearm bones (called the radius and ulna) that occurs just above the wrist. Although this type of injury can be caused by any strong force, Colles is most often associated with trying to break a forward fall.

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

This condition, also called stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is an inflammation of the sheath that wraps around the tendons at the thumb side of the wrist.

Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

This condition is a break of the radius bone at the wrist. The radius is the larger of the two bones that connect the wrist to the elbow. The other bone is called the ulna. The radius supports the majority of forces at the wrist joint with its large joint surface. A fracture of the distal end of the radius - the end nearest the wrist -is one of the most common types of fractures. It may be part of a complex injury that involves other tissues, nerves and bones of the wrist.

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Hip

This is a weakening and collapse of the bone in the head of your femur. That's the ball that fits in the socket of your hip. As this bone gradually dies and breaks apart, you can develop painful arthritis in your hip.

Bursitis of the Hip (Trochanteric Bursitis)

This is an irritation or swelling of the trochanteric bursa. This small, fluid-filled sac is found on the outer side of the femur. It acts as a cushion for the iliotibial band, a thick tendon in your leg.

Hip Fracture

This is a break of the upper part of your femur. The femur is the long bone in your upper leg. At the top of the femur is the "head." This is the ball that fits into your hip socket. A hip fracture may happen at the "neck" of the femur (the thin portion of bone under the head). Fractures may also happen below the neck.

Osteoarthritis of the Hip

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis is common in the hip because the hip bears the weight of the body. Osteoarthritis of the hip can severely impact a person's lifestyle.

Anatomy of the Knee

The knee is the body's largest joint. It's the place where three bones meet: the tibia, the femur and the patella. The knee is a "hinge" joint. It allows the leg to bend in one direction only. Let's take a closer look at the main parts of the knee's anatomy.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries in Women

The anterior cruciate ligament, commonly called the ACL, is a thick, elastic band of tissue that runs from the bottom of the femur to the top of the tibia. It helps stabilize the knee joint. The ACL can become stretched or torn when the knee is twisted or hyperextended. For reasons that are not fully understood, ACL injuries are much more common in women than in men.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear (ACL Tear)

This injury is a tearing of the ACL ligament in the knee joint. The ACL ligament is one of the bands of tissue that connects the femur to the tibia. An ACL tear can be painful. It can cause the knee to become unstable.

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Knee

This condition occurs when a bone's normal blood supply is disrupted. The affected bone cells die and the dead bone weakens. The bone may begin to fracture and collapse, leading to arthritis.

Meniscus Tear

This is a common injury of the knee. Your knee joint is cushioned by two c-shaped wedges of cartilage called the "menisci." Each individual cushion is called a "meniscus." This injury is a tear of one of these cushions.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis is common in the knees because the knees bear the weight of the body. Osteoarthritis of the knee can severely impact a person's lifestyle.

Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

This condition is characterized by the death of an area of cartilage and bone in the knee joint. The dead section may remain in place, forming a lesion, or it may loosen and partially detach from the surrounding bone. It may break away completely and float around inside the joint.

Patellar Fracture

This is a break of the patella. That's the small bone in the front of your knee often called the "kneecap." The kneecap protects the joint and helps link your thigh muscles to your lower leg. A fracture can cause pain and other problems.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Injuries

Strong bands of tissue called "ligaments" help stabilize the bones that form the knee joint. One of these ligaments is called the "PCL." It helps connect the femur to the tibia. If you stretch or tear a PCl, your knee may become unstable.

Quadriceps Tendon Tear

This condition is a tear of the tendon that connects the patella to the quadriceps muscles of the thigh. The quadriceps muscle is used to straighten the leg from the bent position. A complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a disabling injury.

Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

This is pain you feel in the front of one or both of your lower legs. It can be a problem for runners, dancers, gymnasts and other active people.

Tibial Fractures

This condition is a break in the shin bone, called the tibia. A tibial fracture can occur anywhere along the bone, and can range from small cracks to a full break that allows the bone to separate.

Tibial Plateau Fracture

This condition is a fracture at the top of the tibia, also called the shin bone. This fracture usually involves both bone and cartilage, so there is a high risk of developing arthritis from injury to the cartilage cells.

Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Arthritis

This condition, also called AC joint arthrosis, is a degeneration of the joint at the top of the shoulder where the acromion meets the clavicle.

Anatomy of the Shoulder

The shoulder is a complex structure made of three separate joints. They work together to give the shoulder a tremendous range of motion. Let's take a closer look at the main parts of the shoulder's anatomy.

Biceps Tendon Tear (at the Shoulder)

Tendons are strong bands of tissue that connect muscle to bone. With this injury, one of the tendons anchoring your biceps muscle is torn. It may be torn partially or completely. Because the biceps is attached with two separate tendons, you may find that you can still use your biceps muscle even if one tendon is completely torn.

​Burners and Stingers

These are warm or painful sensations caused by an injury to the brachial plexus. This is a network of nerves that passes through your shoulder. They travel down your arm and to your hand.

Bursitis of the Shoulder (Subacromial Bursitis)

This is a swelling of a fluid-filled sac called the "subacromial bursa." It's in the shoulder, between a bony protrusion called the "acromion" and the rotator cuff. You have similar sacs near other large joints throughout your body. They act as cushions between your bones and your soft tissue. Normally they have a small amount of fluid inside them. But sometimes they can swell. We call that "bursitis."

Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

This is a common shoulder injury. It's a break of the bone that rests between the shoulder blade and the sternum. We call it the "collarbone." Your collarbones help connect your arms to your body.

Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

This is stiffening of your shoulder. It happens over time, and you may not know what caused it. With a frozen shoulder, it can be hard for you to be as active as you like.

Glenoid Labrum Tear

If you have pain in your shoulder, you may have a torn labrum. That's the thick band of tissue that goes around your shoulder socket. It helps make the socket deeper. It cushions the bone of your upper arm and keeps it from slipping.

Proximal Humerus Fracture (Broken Shoulder)

This condition is a fracture of the head of the humerus - the "ball" of the shoulder's ball-and-socket.

Rotator Cuff Injuries

The rotator cuff muscles and tendons hold your upper arm bone in your shoulder socket. A hard fall, repetitive arm motions or problems with the structure of your shoulder can injure the rotator cuff.

Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons in each shoulder. It holds your upper arm bone in your shoulder socket. It keeps your arm stable while allowing it to lift and rotate. Too much stress on the rotator cuff can cause a tear. This can be a painful injury.

Shoulder Dislocation

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball of your upper arm bone fits into a socket in your shoulder blade. If the ball slips out, your shoulder has "dislocated."

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

This is a painful pinching of soft tissues in your shoulder. It happens when these tissues rub and press against a part of your shoulder blade called the "acromion." This can irritate your rotator cuff tendons, and also a soft sac called the "subacromial bursa."

Shoulder Instability

This is a looseness of the shoulder joint. With it, your arm slides around too much in the socket. It may slip out of the socket easily. Instability can happen because the ligaments that hold your shoulder together aren't tight enough. Or, the cartilage around your shoulder socket may be damaged.

Shoulder Separation

This is an injury of the acromioclavicular joint (commonly called the "AC" joint). This is the joint where the clavicle meets the scapula. A shoulder separation is a stretching or a tearing of the ligaments that support these bones. This allows the bones to move out of position.

SLAP Tear (Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior Tear)

This condition is a tear of the labrum in the shoulder joint. The labrum is a ring of cartilage around the shoulder socket that stabilizes the head of the humerus. A SLAP tear occurs at the point where the biceps tendon attaches to the labrum.

Patient Videos

Achilles Tendon Injuries

Acromioclavicular Joint Arthritis

Anatomy of the Knee

Anatomy of the Shoulder

Ankle Sprains

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries in Women

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear (ACL Tear)

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Hip

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Knee

Biceps Tendon Tear (at the Shoulder)

Burners and Stingers

Bursitis of the Hip (Trochanteric Bursitis)

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

Colles Fractures

De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

Glenoid Labrum Tear

Golfer's Elbow

Hip Fracture

Jones Fracture

Meniscus Tear

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

Overuse Injuries of the Elbow

Patellar Fracture

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Injuries

Proximal Humerus Fracture (Broken Shoulder)

Quadriceps Tendon Tear

Rotator Cuff Injuries

Rotator Cuff Tear

Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

Shoulder Dislocation

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder Separation

SLAP Tear (Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior Tear)

Tennis Elbow

Throwing Injuries

Tibial Fractures

Tibial Plateau Fracture

Triceps Tendonitis

Ulnar Collateral Ligament

Total Shoulder Replacement

Total Hip Replacement

Reverse total shoulder replacement

Partial Knee Replacement

Knee Arthroscopy

ACL Reconstruction

Mini Incision Total Knee Replacement

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder stabilization

Rotator cuff repairs

Dr. Acus specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of both orthopaedic and sports-related conditions. 

An expert in reconstruction surgery of the knee, shoulder, and hip to get patients back to the lifestyle and activities they love
For Dr. Acus, improving his patients’ mobility and quality of life is a top priority. Total hip, knee, and shoulder replacements can dramatically improve quality of life. Total joint and partial joint surgery can help relieve pain and restore function in severely diseased joints. If surgery is required, you can trust your care to Dr. Acus who provides his patients with an individualized, comprehensive, expert plan of care. Learn more about the following surgical procedures in which he specializes:

Total shoulder replacement

Total shoulder replacement is a very successful procedure for treating the severe pain and stiffness that often results from arthritis.  The primary goal of shoulder replacement surgery is pain relief, with a secondary benefit of restoring motion, strength, function, and assisting patients to return to an activity level as normal as possible. In shoulder replacement surgery the damaged parts of the shoulder are removed and replaced with artificial components.

Total hip replacement

In this surgery, the surgeon removes the two damaged and worn parts of the hip joint – the hip socket (acetabulum) and the ball (femoral head) – and replaces them with smooth, artificial implants called prostheses to help make the hip strong, stable and flexible again.

Reverse total shoulder replacement 

A reverse total shoulder replacement works better for people with rotator cuff tears because it relies on different muscles to move the arm. The reverse total shoulder replacement relies on the deltoid muscle, instead of the rotator cuff, to power and position the arm.

Partial knee replacement (arthrosurface hemicap resurfacing)

 In this procedure, the surgeon uses a contoured surface implant to cover the area with damaged cartilage to protect the remaining healthy cartilage in the knee joint, preventing further damage to the joint while maintaining the patient’s anatomy and motion.

A leader in sports medicine

Dr. Acus provides specialized care for your injuries that occur during exercise or athletic activity.  He works collaboratively with athletic trainers and physical therapists to provide the best possible care not only for professional athletes, but for people who participate in recreational athletics or simply exercise to stay healthy and active – to quickly diagnose and treat sports injuries to get you back to doing what you love to do.

Dr. Acus has an extensive history serving as team physician for The University of Central Florida, Rawlins College, and the Orlando Magic, where he took care of NBA athletes including Shaquille O’Neal, Nick Anderson, and Steve Kerr.  For the last 16 years he, along with Dr. Timothy Myer, has served as head team physician at the University of Akron, caring for all their Division 1 athletes. Dr. Acus offers you the highest quality of sports medicine care in northeast Ohio.  Learn more about the conditions he treats, including:

Knee Arthroscopy

A knee arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that allows the surgeon to view the knee joint without making a large incision (cut) through the skin and other soft tissues.  Arthroscopy is used to diagnose and treat a wide range of knee problems. 

ACL Reconstruction

ACL reconstruction is outpatient surgery to replace a torn anterior cruciate ligament – one of the major ligaments in your knee. The surgeon creates small incisions around your knee joint and removes the torn ligament, replacing it with a piece of tendon from another part of your knee or a deceased donor.

Mini Incision Total Knee Replacement

In a mini-incision total knee replacement, the surgeon uses a shorter incision and a different, less-invasive technique to expose the joint, with a goal of reducing postoperative pain and speeding recover.

Shoulder Arthroscopy 

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure used to visualize, diagnose, and treat various problems inside the shoulder joint and in the space surrounding the rotator cuff.  During an shoulder arthroscopy the surgeon inserts a small camera, called an arthroscope, into your shoulder joint. The camera displays images on a television screen, and the surgeon guides miniature surgical instruments to treat a variety of common shoulder problems, including bursitis, tendonitis, arthritis, impingement, rotator cuff tears, labral tears and shoulder instability. 

Shoulder stabilization 

The Bankart Repair treats patients that have anterior shoulder instability. Many patients who suffer a traumatic dislocation of their shoulder also tear the fibrocartilage labrum at the front of their shoulder.  This procedure repairs that tear to stabilize the shoulder and prevent it from continuing to dislocate, allowing patients to return to full normal activities with a greatly reduced risk of a redislocation. 

Rotator cuff repairs (arthroscopic)

If you have a torn rotator cuff, an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair may be recommended to fix the tear. Arthroscopic repair is usually performed as an outpatient procedure and is the least invasive method used to repair a torn rotator cuff. During an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair the surgeon inserts a small camera, called an arthroscope, into your shoulder joint. The camera displays images on a television screen, and the surgeon guides miniature surgical instruments to repair the tear.

A specialist in state-of-the-art joint preservation surgery

Cartilage is the complex tissue that covers all the joint surfaces in our bodies. Cartilage restoration offers patients new and exciting treatment options. Dr. Acus offers state-of-the-art joint preservation procedures, including:

Autologous chondrocyte/cartilage implantation surgery (ACI)

ACI surgery treats cartilage damage caused by injury or degeneration. In this procedure, the patient’s own cartilage cells are utilized to repair knee cartilage.  This procedure is ideal for patients with only small areas of cartilage damage, who have significant pain and swelling, and who are not obese.

Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation Surgery (OATS) for osteoarthritis in the knee

OATS surgery replaces damaged cartilage in the knee with healthy cartilage from a donor, relieving pain and restoring movement and function to the joint. It is usually performed on patients with arthritis, chronic injuries, and other joint-related conditions, and is ideal for patients with small areas of cartilage damage that can be easily repaired with a graft.

Relieving pain and restoring function

Dr. Acus provides a full complement of comprehensive orthopaedic services to meet your needs. Other conditions that he treats include:

  • Achilles tendon injuries
  • Jones fracture (a break between the base and shaft of the fifth metatarsal bone of the foot)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries in women
  • ACL tears
  • Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) tears
  • Quadriceps tendon tear
  • Meniscus tears
  • Carpal tunnel release (open)
  • Trigger digit release